THE BASICS OF CONTEMPT OF COURT

When a party has been ordered by a court to do something and they do not do it, they may be held in contempt of court. The two best examples are child support and visitation. A person may be held in contempt of court if they are ordered to pay child support and they do not pay it. Likewise, a person may be held in contempt of court if they are ordered to produce a child for visitation, and they do not produce the child. In all cases, being found in contempt of court is a punishment.

CIVIL AND CRIMINAL CONTEMPT

There are two kinds of contempt:  civil and criminal. In a civil contempt action, a person found in contempt will be forced to perform as the court has ordered them. A person can be jailed until they comply with the order.  In a criminal contempt, a person is simply jailed for non-compliance. 

ATTORNEYS FEES AND CONTEMPT

When a person is found in contempt, they can be ordered to pay the attorneys fees of the person who was forced to bring them to court.